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Pop-Up Mother's Day Card

Pop-Up Mother’s Day Card

INTRODUCTION

For moms near and far, this gorgeous greeting card makes for a special flower delivery. A flat card blooms into a three-dimensional arrangement that’s much more unexpected than a vase of roses. It looks intricate but takes only some snippets of paper and cleverly placed tape to create.

This project may seem complicated at first glance, but once you follow the instructions here, you’ll realize just how easy it is to re-create.

Pop-Up Mother's Day Card

Pop-Up Mother's Day Card

Pop-Up Mother's Day Card

Pop-Up Mother's Day Card

Pop-Up Mother's Day Card

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PATTERN 

download free pattern here

MATERIALS

  • Text-weight paper

  • Glue stick

  • Double-sided tape

  • Card stock

STEPS

  1. Cut seven 4-inch squares of paper in desired colors. Fold a square into quarters. Fold down 1 flap diagonally; flip the square of paper over and fold down the other flap, forming a triangle as shown. Print petal template; trace it onto the triangle, and cut out. Unfold, and cut 1 petal from flower; close gap by overlapping petals on either side and securing with glue stick. Repeat with other squares. 

  2. Attach pieces of double-sided tape to petals, as indicated by dots. Start sticking flowers to one another: Flowers B and C each overlap a petal with A; then flower D goes on top, completely overlapping A.

  3. Attach flowers E and F to the stack to overlap B and C.

  4. Attach G to the top, overlapping D. Cut out some freehand leaves from green paper, place double-sided tape on the bottom, and attach them to the flowers.

  5. Cut a piece of card stock into a 10-by-6-inch rectangle, and fold in half to form a card. Place the folded flower stack inside of the opened card as shown. Place a piece of double-sided tape as shown; close card, and press firmly to adhere. Open card and repeat, attaching the other side of the flower stack to the inside of the card.

    Via at: http://www.marthastewart.com

A Brief History of the Pop-Up Book

Books contain tremendous power. They captivate our minds, change the way we look at the world, and transport us to faraway lands. It seems hardly possible to make books any richer than they already are. However, through the beauty of illustrations and the mechanics of pop-up books, readers of all ages can find an even greater appreciation for literature.

The Beginnings of Paper Mechanics

1

The first “pop-up” was more of a machine than book. It was invented by Ramon Llull (ca. 1232-1315), a writer, theologian, and mathematician, who later became a martyr in the Roman Catholic Church. Called a “Lullian Circle,” the device was composed of several revolving, affixed circles each annotating an ideal. The separate paper discs featured their own specific category such as: knowledge, verbs, and adjectives. The circles were cut out and fastened together so that they could rotate upon each other as needed. According to Llull, there were a finite number of truths in all areas of knowledge. He believed that the various combinations in the Lullian Circle would reveal truths in all areas of inquiry. 

The fourteenth century saw a rise in movable books, particularly the “turn-up” style. These volumes became especially popular for medical students learning human anatomy. One of the most highly praised was printed by Andreas Vesalius in 1543. In his book, De Humani Corporis Fabrica Librorum Epitome, Vesalius not only shared his immense anatomical knowledge with readers, but displayed a beautiful regard for illustrations which continues to be upheld to this day.

2 

It was not until much later—the late 1700s—that books were introduced solely for children’s entertainment. With the creation of children’s literature by John Newbery, publishers were encouraged to find new ways to appeal to their younger audience. In 1765, Robert Sayer created a movable book known as the “lift-the-flap” style. In this method, a paper was folded into four parts with each section illustrated. Then, at the top and bottom of the initial sheet, was a glued sheet containing text and pictures. This top sheet was then cut horizontally in the middle so that the picture beneath would be exposed after lifting the flaps masking it. The popularity of these books quickly grew and acquired different names depending on the content or composition of the illustrations. These names included: “metamorphoses”, “harlequinades”, and “toilet books”.  

In the 1800s, readers were introduced to a new style of book in which the illustrations could be removed. Most common were paper dolls that could be dressed up or down in accordance with the story, or pages that could be removed and propped up while reading. During this age, novels that were originally written for adult audiences, such as Gulliver’s Travels (1726) and Robinson Crusoe (1719), were being illustrated with a younger audience in mind as publishing houses sought to expand their markets. 

By 1860, movable books began to be produced on a mass scale. Dean & Son publishing company was the first to do so. They hired several artists to create new kinds of movable books and pictures. This led to the newest – and perhaps greatest – movable method, utilizing ribbons as a buttress to hold the images up on the page and project the scene–making it come alive.

3

It is also important to acknowledge the genius of Lothar Meggendorfer who made an appearance at the same time. Meggendorfer is highly honored for his incredibly complex animations. He made it possible for the pull of a tab to animate an entire scene, for example a dinner party’s eyes, jaws, arms, and legs could move all at once. Meggendorfer is credited for engineering and illustrating over 200 works, including the scene above. 

A Modern View of Pop-Ups

The 1900s saw the creation of yet another kind of movable book, one very similar to the pop-up books of today. With the expertise of S. Louis Giraud, the simple action of turning a page brought illustrations alive, visible from all angles. Another feat was the increase of affordable pop-up books through the use of mass-production and inexpensive materials. By the 1940s, Blue Ribbon Publishing of New York had made its name and coined the phrase “pop-up book.”

4

In the mid-1900s, the publication of pop-up books was on the decline until artist Voitech Kubasta designed pop-up books for his employer in Prague. Kubasta’s beautiful books did not go unnoticed; however, the Warsaw Pact prevented the United States from importing the books from Czechoslovakia. Not wanting to miss an opportunity, American publisher Waldo Hunt began his own company, Graphics International, and manufactured his own pop-ups. He was so successful in revitalizing the genre that Publisher’s Weekly named him “the father of the modern pop-up book industry.” His firm, Intervisual Communications (ICI), creates many of the movable books sold in the present day.

Via: Bookstellyouwhy.com

How to make Heart Greeting Card

How to make Heart Greeting Card for New Year’s Day

HOW TO MAKE HEART GREETING CARD FOR NEW YEAR’S DAY

On New Year’s Day, a holiday of people who are in love, everyone gives greeting card to each other.

How to make Heart Greeting Card

This day is a good opportunity to show your feelings with an unusual gift.
We’ll guide make greeting card for this holiday of love.
This product was created by AOC Craft

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For more tutorials, videos or patterns, please follow and check out website at http://aoccraft.com/
Our website supply information about the cutting art, wood or paper cutting, free patterns or tutorials for DIY wood/paper cutting.
Besides, you can find some articals for design with graphic software (as Coreldraw, photoshop, sketchup, blender….)

—————————————-­—–
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Website: http://aocraft.com
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How to make New Year Greeting Card

How to make New Year Greeting Card

Here’s a fun way to make a creative New Year greeting card with threads. And, by the way, there’s no sewing involved

Another new year is around the corner. So it’s best to start working on that new year greeting card project sooner than later.

How to make New Year Greeting Card

Either way, this time, wouldn’t you like to set off the coming year by putting together a cool and creative card?

If so, then, for this card, use the Spirelli string art technique. Yes, it’s possible to sew a little with this technique, However, there’s no sewing on this card.

Apart from this, there are different colors and types of threads used in putting this new year greeting card together.

Which colors and types would you use in creating yours?

New Year Greeting Card Messages from Fireworks Theme

A cool card like this gives you an opportunity to add humor by relating the greeting card message to the card’s art or theme. For instance:

Have a Happy Sparkly New Year!

  Tools and Materials

  • 6.5” x 9” maroon cardstock paper
  • 4” x 6” black cardstock paper
  • 5.5” x 8.5” black cardstock paper
  • Multicolored metallic thread spool
  • Metallic gold and copper colored thread spools
  • Rayon red, light blue, light green, and pink colored machine embroidery thread spools
  • One ¼” white acrylic jewels
  • Four ⅛” acrylic jewels of assorted colors
  • Gold pen
  • White pen
  • Drawing pencil
          
  • Eraser
  • Scissors
  • Zigzag shape edge decorating scissors
  • Circle template
  • Sliding paper trimmer
  • Metal ruler
  • Scoring stick
  • Cutting mat
  • Craft cutting knife
  • Paper masking tape
  • Glue

Instructions – Step by Step 

How to make New Year Greeting Card       

1. On the 5.5” x 8.5” black cardstock paper, use a pencil and circle template to draw a 2” diameter circle.

2. On this same black cardstock, draw four other 1.5” diameter circles about 1” apart from one edge to another

How to make New Year Greeting Card  

3. Use the zigzag decorative edge scissors to cut out these five circles.

4. Erase the pencil marks on these circles. Or use these pencil marked sides as the bottom faces.

5. On the 2” diameter circle, use the multicolored metallic thread to wrap around the grooves of the zigzag cuts.

After the first turn, go through another turn but this time with a different offset.

How to make New Year Greeting Card  

6. On the first 1.5” diameter circle, use the multicolored metallic thread to wrap around the grooves of the zigzag cuts as well.

7. On the second 1.5” diameter circles, first, use the metallic gold thread around on the circle grooves. Then use the metallic copper thread at a different offset.

How to make New Year Greeting Card  

8. On the third 1.5” diameter circles, first, use the light blue rayon thread around on the circle grooves. Then use the light green rayon thread at a different offset.

9. On the last 1.5” diameter circles, first, use the pink rayon thread around on the circle grooves. Then use the red rayon copper thread at a different offset.

10. Put all the circles in place just to know their approximate locations on the 4” x 6” black cardstock paper. Don’t glue them down yet.

11.On this same cardstock, write “Happy New Year!” with white pen on the bottom right corner.

How to make New Year Greeting Card  

12. Use the gold pen to trace out a square-like pattern that looks like square rooftops at a distant horizon. Draw this just above the white lettering.

13. Use the gold pen to randomly trace out the fireworks path from the distant roof top horizon to the circle locations.

How to make New Year Greeting Card  

14. Score the 6.5” x 9” maroon cardstock paper right in the middle and fold into a 4.5” x 6.5” card

15. Glue the completed 4” x 6” black cardstock right in the middle of the folded maroon cardstock. This leaves a ¼” margin all around the black cardstock paper.

How to make New Year Greeting Card  

Glue all the circles in place on the black cardstock. The biggest circle shifts out about 3/16” from the edge of the black cardstock. And the other circles shift out ⅛” from the edges as well.

Glue the acrylic jewels at the center of the finished circles. Use the biggest jewel for the biggest circle.

 And with that last step, the card is finished.

Hope you’ve decided on the colors and types of thread to use in creating your own new year greeting card.

From the pictures above, there were a few other metallic strings that did not make it into the card. They include silver and yellow gold colored metallic thread spools.

Apart from these, there are many more options in the craft and sewing stores.

So the choice is yours. Have fun with the hunt and decision.

And, at the end of the day, may you have a new year that’s as fun and vibrant as this new year greeting card depicts.

Via Creative Greeting Card Ideas

 

 

 

 

Base for origamic architecture design

Designing origamic architecture is not hard, but it does take a lot of time and patience. The art form has as many possibilities and your imagination is the limit. This mini lesson will take you through the beginning steps of designing origamic architecture.

Most common in OA are houses and buildings: these are easy (relatively speaking) in that they are linear. Cutting straight lines with an X-acto knife and a ruler is straightforward. Be careful though, X-acto knives are sharp and you wouldn’t want to hurt yourself or slice too long a line.

OA which have domes, curls, or swirls are made the same way as linear cuts. However, they are more challenging because you need to manage your knife with good control. In many ways, you are like a surgeon. This mini lesson will not address these rounded cuts, but you may try them yourself.

Designing Origamic Architecture: Exercise 1

ex1

To begin, let’s try an easy pop-up card that you can make with scissors. Fold a piece of paper in half and cut two notches (step 1). Valley fold and then unfold the flap of paper (step 2 & 3). Open the paper and push the flap inwards so that it lies in between the folded sheet (step 4). Make sure that the flap folds along the crease made in step 2. 

There you go, your first pop-up box! An OA expert would draw the pattern as shown on the right.

The black line across the middle of the sheet represents the fold line: this is where the paper is folded in half to make the card.
The vertical black lines represent the places where you cut.
The blue line represent valley folds.
The red line represent mountain folds.
Other artists may use slightly different notation, but the idea will be similar.

Designing Origamic Architecture: Exercise 2

ex2            ex2.1

Let’s add another box on top of the box pop-up made above. To do this, cut two notches on the edge labeled A. Only cut the top folded sheet (if you cut all 2 layers, you will get three boxes). Repeat the folding sequence as in exercise 1. The result is a box on top of box.

The upper box will always be a little smaller than the bottom box. You can repeat this process to get stacks of boxes. The pattern (or diagram) is shown below.

Examine it carefully and confirm that the valley folds and mountain folds are as described. Be sure to understand the pattern because in the next exercises, we will no longer show the detailed instructions. All information will be compressed in one image: the pattern.

Designing Origamic Architecture: Exercise 3

ex3 Let’s try the same thing again but with the inner edge labeled B. Make an easy pop up box as in exercise 1. Open the card slightly, jam scissors between the sheets and cut two notches in the inner folded edge B. Valley fold and unfold this new flap. Push the small flap towards the back of the card.

ex3.1 

Now it looks like a chair with wide armrests. The pattern is shown on the right. If you repeat the exercise using the edge labeled C, you will get a small box in front of the original big box. This is the same as the result of exercise 2 flipped over. 

 

ex3.2

Designing Origamic Architecture: Exercise 4

There are other variations you can try, but let’s move away from the boxy pop-up. Imagine that you want a box that is flat like a shirt-gift box. Namely, it is short and deep.

ex4 To make the box short, the cut above the fold line (A) should be short. And, to make the box deep, the cut below the fold line (B) should be long. Because the lengths of the cuts above and below the fold line are not the same, you can’t use scissors anymore. Time to move on to the X-acto knife.

ex4.1 Make the cuts with an X-acto knife and push the flap so that it lies in between the folded paper. You will need to make valley folds at the blue lines. In order for the pop-up to look like a gift-box, the height at the front of the box (H) must be the same as the height of the cut above the fold line (A). Since you can measure A, you can determine the exact location of the mountain fold (red line)

An OA expert would proceed this way: – draw the lines where cuts and folds will occur, – make the cuts, – make the necessary folds one by one, and then – collapse the pop-up into its final shape.

Turn this pop-up upside down. Now you have a building found in many OA designs. Make a dome roof, cut out windows and doors: congratulations, you’ve made your first building! 

ex4.2

Designing Origamic Architecture: Exercise 5

ex5

Consider the shirt gift-box above. Let’s make this box skinny so we have room to add other elements in the pop-up. Let’s make a few more boxes beside it. Let’s make it exciting my making the other boxes bigger and bigger. Better yet, let’s push the boxes side by side. Now it looks like a staircase.

ex5.1 The pattern for the staircase is show on the right. Copy this onto your paper, make the cuts using an X-acto knife. Use a creasing tool to help you make all the valley and mountain folds. Collapse the model and you have a staircase!

Careful examination of the staircase will show that you didn’t need to cut each step all the way down to the base of the paper. You can modify your pattern and make a more sturdy staircase.

ex5.2

How to make 3D Heart Valentine Day Pop up Card

How to make 3D Heart Valentine Day Pop-up Card

This pop-up card can be used for Valentine’s day, or for a birthday for a special person.

This pop-up card will surely impress the person you give it to.

The heart is a sliceform design.

How to make 3D Heart Valentine Day Pop up Card

How to make 3D Heart Valentine Day Pop-up Card

– Instruction

How to make 3D Heart Valentine Day Pop up Card - Material

Materials

Step 1 - Cutting

Step 1 – Cutting

Step 2 - Assemble

Step 2 – Assemble

Step 3 - Put craft into the paper using thread

Step 3 – Put craft into the paper using thread

Step 4 - Put craft into the paper using glues

Step 4 – Put craft into the paper using glues

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For more tutorials, videos or patterns, please follow and check out website at http://aoccraft.com/
Our website supply information about the cutting art, wood or paper cutting, free patterns or tutorials for DIY wood/paper cutting. Besides, you can find some articals for design with graphic software (as Coreldraw, photoshop, sketchup, blender….)
—————————————-­—–
AOC Craft
Website: http://aocraft.com
Facebook: https://fb.com/artofcutting
Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/thecuttingart/

Ideas for Valentine’s Day Window Cards

Ideas for Window Valentine’s Day Cards

A slight variation from stencil cards is window cards.  Instead of cutting a shape in a stencil, you can cut the shapes or text directly on the front cover of the Valentine’s Day cards.  You can decorate your card behind the mirror in a number of ways, such as putting sentimental photos, some patterned paper, or even some meaningful words.  We made a variety of window cards with different shapes and patterns.  Here’s a look at the cards we made:

Ideas for Valentine’s Day Window Cards

Ideas for Window Valentine’s Day Cards

[dt_sc_one_third first]Ideas for Valentine’s Day Window Cards[/dt_sc_one_third]
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The cards in the top row have heart windows that we filled with pictures of our baby daughter. The bottom row has simple elegant rose cut out windows.

These are the 3 simple instructions on how to make window Valentine’s Day cards.

Step 1:

Draw the heart shapes on the front of the card using a pencil (draw lightly as you will need to erase any pencil marks that remains after cutting).  You can also use stencils to draw your heart. 

Follow the first step of the instructions in the Stencil Card section above to make your own stencil.  You can also draw other shapes such as flowers, balloons or square windows.  If you do not want to draw directly on your card, draw your pattern on a sheet of paper, and use this as a template to cut through your card. 

Tape or use repositionable glue to attach the template to your card.

Step 2:

If your pattern is large enough, you can use scissors to cut the window out.  If your pattern is small or complex, then you will want to use an X-Acto knife to cut the shapes out.  I’d recommend cutting your card on a self-healing mat or something you don’t mind cutting up (old magazine, stack of paper, phone book), so you do not damage your table top.

Step 3:

Finish the card by decorating the card behind the window.  Here are some creative ideas of things to put behind the window:  a photo; patterned paper, text, stenciled shapes, chocolate hearts or kisses.

Ideas for Valentine’s Day Stencil Cards

Using stencils is a great way to create hearts on the front of your card.  There are two general ways to use stencils.  You can cut a hole and color inside the hole, or cut a shape and color around the shape.  You can be very creative with the way you color inside or around your stencil.  You can use almost any media such as spray paint, spray inks, markers, pastels, acrylics, watercolor, glitter…the possibilities are endless!  Try experimenting on some scrap paper to see which media you like best.  We had some fun making cards with stencils.  We made the cards below using stencils and spray paint.

 

 

We also used acrylic paint and stencils for a very simple brushed look.

   

Using a stencil heart, we created the cards below with a marker (left) and glue and glitter (right).

  

Here are instructions on how to use stencil techniques to decorate your Valentine’s Day card.

1. Create a stencil by cutting out your desired shapes in a piece of paper or card stock.  To make hearts, fold your cardstock or paper in half and cut half a heart along the crease.  Now you can use the heart hole or the heart itself as a stencil.  If you’re using the heart hole as a stencil, then make sure that the entire stencil is larger than your card so you don’t get any of your colors where you don’t want them to be.  I find that using a paper stencil works better than cardboard.

2. This step is optional but I find it helpful.  Use repositionable glue or spray (Krylon Easy Tact Spray) to attach the stencil to your card.  This helps prevent colors from getting underneath your stencil, especially if you use a spray paint.  You can also use some double-sided tape, but you want to be very careful not to tear your card while removing the stencil.  To reduce the stickiness of the tape, I sometimes stick it to my clothes to get some lint stuck on it first.

3. Use your chosen media to color inside or around your stencil.  Make sure you do not color underneath your stencil.  This may take some practice to get the perfect look.  You can even try to mix different media: acrylic and glitter, spray paint and pastel…etc.  You can even use both the window or shape stencil together with different sized hearts.

Here are other examples of stencil cards using acrylic paint from Bless This Mess and spray inks from Artful Kids.  The Crafty Crow used a very unique technique with Q-tips and stencils to make a Valentine’s day card.

Via at http://www.creativepopupcards.com

Ideas for Valentine’s Day Cards With Cut Out Hearts

The simplest way to decorate your card is to glue hearts to the front cover of your Valentine’s Day card.  The hearts can be different sizes, shapes or colors.  They can be placed in random, or a pattern.  Here are examples of simple cards we made decorated with cut out hearts.

  

  

These are the 4 simple steps to decorate your card with cut out hearts.

1. Create a template for your hearts by folding a piece of card stock or paper in half and cutting out half the heart along the center crease.  You can also cut the hearts out directly using this method if you don’t mind a crease down the center of your heart. This may take a little practice to get the shape of the heart just right.  If you are good at freehand drawing or if you want to make asymmetrical hearts, then just draw the hearts by hand and skip to the third step.

2. Use the hearts you just cut out to trace heart shapes on the paper you want to make your hearts out of.  This is assuming you don’t use your heart cut outs (with the crease down the center) directly on your card.  The paper you trace the hearts on can be as simple as construction paper or colored card stock.  You can also be creative by using custom patterned paper from an art store such as Michaels.  Try using different textured papers to not only give your card contrasting colors, but also contrasting textures.  My favorite papers are the rough unfinished papers where you can see the fibers, and sometimes embedded flower petals.  If you don’t have an art store nearby, you can also use paper around the house such as wrapping paper (which sometimes have a nice shiny finish), card board, newspaper/magazines, sheet music, or even recycled junk mail.

3. Cut out the hearts that you traced.  Another variation is to tear the heart shapes so the edges of the paper are rough.  This works best with textured paper that has a lot of fibers.  This will take some practice.  You can also fold the paper in half and tear the outline of half the heart along the crease so that the heart is symmetrical.

4. Glue the hearts on the front cover in a creative pattern.  You can glue one simple heart in the center or you can glue many hearts in a set or random pattern.

Via at http://www.creativepopupcards.com

Ideas for Valentine’s Day Pop up Cards

I may be a little biased, but pop up cards are the most impressive types of Valentine’s Day cards to make for someone. That’s why my Rich makes them for me, because he’s always still finding ways to impress me! I find it so sweet!

The 3-dimensional nature of the card often surprises the person receiving the card when he or she opens it.   Pop up cards are more complex to make than normal cards, and requires a little more effort to make, but definitely well worth it as it tends to give a higher WOW factor! Within the category of pop up cards, there is a wide range of designs with varying levels of difficulty. The two most common Valentine’s Day pop up cards are the simple “Center Folded Heart Card” and the “90 Degree Stepped Heart Card”.   If you have children, these pop up cards are simple enough to make with them. They are wonderful craft ideas!

Center Folded Heart Card

This is what the “Center Folded Heart Card” looks like.

   

The cards on the left and center are made from 2 sheets of colored card stock.  The card on the right was made with one sheet of printed card stock.  To make the cards shown above, watch Rich’s tutorial below.

Here are step by step instructions on how to make the “Center Folded Heart Card”:

1. Fold a sheet of card stock in half.

2. Cut the shape of half a heart along the folded edge, leaving the edge of the heart furthest away from the center fold uncut.  The uncut section should be parallel with the center fold.

3.  Unfold the card and reverse the folds of the heart so that the center of the heart folds inwards when the card is closed.

4. Glue another piece of card stock to the outside off the card.

90 Degree Stepped Heart Card

The second most common Valentine’s Day pop up card is the “90 Degree Stepped Heart” card.  This is what the card looks like:

  

There are several different versions of this card.  Here is Rich’s video on how to make this card:

Here are step by step instructions on how to make the “90 Degree Stepped Heart Card”:

1. Fold a sheet of card stock in half.

2. Cut two slits of the same length perpendicular to the folded edge.

3. Unfold the card and reverse the folds of the “step” so that it folds inwards.

4. Cut out a heart shape from another piece of card stock and glue it to the “step” of the inside card.

5. Glue another piece of card sock to the outside of the card.

If you want to make a pop up card that is guaranteed to impress, then try making one of the unique pop up cards below!  Just click on the image for the tutorial.

  

 

After making such an impressive Valentine’s Day pop up card, you may be wondering how one would go about decorating the front cover of the card?  You can use some of the designs from the following cards to decorate your pop up card.  These designs are also great to make as a standalone card, with your personal message in the inside.

Via http://www.creativepopupcards.com

How to Make a Step Pop up Card and Mechanism

Step 1: Supplies and Prep

You’ll need two card blanks of the same size for the card face and the pop up card mechanism. The pop up card mechanism is made separately and is glued inside the card face. It’s best to use card blanks of the same color to camouflage the pop up mechanism somewhat.

To make stamped pop up elements you will need white cardstock and colored cardstock for mats.

Gather a variety of paper and cardstock that coordinate with the colors used in your card.

Step 2: Make Card Face

Use one of the card blanks to make the card face. The card face can be made using any technique you like; however, it is important that the card have a horizontal aspect to make the most effective use of the step pop up. Set aside the completed card face while you make the pop up.

The sample birthday card features serendipity squares that make good use of your paper scraps.

Step 3: Make pop up Elements

pop up elements are glued to the pop up steps/platforms. Anything that is flat and will fit inside the folded card can be used. For the sample card, a stamped, matted message card and a stamped cutout are used. Your matted message card should be about 1¼” to 1½” by 3¼” to 3½”. The cutout can be up to about 2″ square.

Tip:

  • Use felt-tip markers to color the stamped image and tiny rubber stamps to decorate the message card.

Step 4: Make Step pop up Card

Use the second folded card blank to make the pop up mechanism. To form the pop up steps/platforms, you will cut parallel slits from the folded edge of the card blank.

First, use the pencil and ruler to draw a line 1½” from the folded edge and parallel to it. Next, draw two vertical lines from the first line to the folded edge—they should be about 2½” apart and parallel to each other. The left line should be about ¾” from the left edge of the card blank.

About ¾” to the right of the first step, draw a second step. Draw a line 1¼” from the fold with vertical parallel lines that are ¾” apart.

Tip:

  • For a simpler pop up, only make the first step. It can be drawn anywhere along the fold, but no closer than ¾” from either side.
  • Skip the measuring by using templates. See the side bar to the right for details.

Cut on the vertical lines from the folded edge to the drawn horizontal line.

Fold the cut steps on the horizontal line between the cut lines. Unfold.

Open the card blank and push the steps through to the other side. With the pencil lines on the outside, fold the card blank at a 90° angle. You will be gluing the pop up elements to these steps/platforms.

Step 5: Test pop up Card

Test your pop up mechanism by making sure it folds flat. Also, use repositionable tape or glue to attach the pop up elements to the pop up steps. Fold the pop up flat and make sure the pop up elements do not extend beyond the edges of the folded card.

Make any adjustments needed before proceeding.

Step 6: Glue Together

Glue the pop up mechanism inside the card face, being sure to align the edges. Apply glue to one side of the pop up, avoiding the step, and slip it inside the card face. Apply glue to the other side and fold the card face over onto it.

Open the card and allow the glue to dry.

Step 7: Glue pop up Elements and Finish Card

Glue the pop up elements to the steps. Decorate the card behind and around the pop up steps. You might stamp more images of the cutout, add a greeting or write a message. Use your imagination!

That’s it! Your pop up card is done!

Via: auntannie.com

phân loại các loại gỗ công nghiệp - gỗ nhựa

Phân loại các loại gỗ công nghiệp

  1. Gỗ dán (Plywood):

+ Cấu tạo: Nhiều lớp gỗ mỏng ~1mm ép chồng vuông góc với nhau bằng keo chuyên dụng

+ Tính chất: Không nứt, không co ngót, ít mối mọt, chịu lực cao. Có gỗ dán thường, gỗ dán chịu nước phủ phim, phủ keo. Bề mặt thường không phẳng nhẵn

+ Độ dày thông dụng: 3mm, 5mm, 6mm, 8mm, 10mm, 12mm, 15mm, 18mm, 20mm, 25mm

+ Ứng dụng: Gia công phần thô đồ nội thất gia đình, văn phòng, quảng cáo, làm lõi cho bề mặt veneer. Loại chịu nước làm copha, gia cố ngoài trời…

phân loại các loại gỗ công nghiệp-gỗ dán

phân loại các loại gỗ công nghiệp – gỗ dán

  1. Gỗ ván dăm (OKAL):

+ Cấu tạo: Gỗ tự nhiên xay thành dăm, trộn với keo chuyên dụng và ép gia cường theo quy cách.

+ Tính chất: Không co ngót,  ít mối mọt, chịu lực vừa phải. Bề mặt có độ phẳng mịn tương đối cao. Loại thường các cạnh rất dễ bị sứt mẻ, chịu ẩm tương đối kém. Loại chịu ẩm thường có lõi màu xanh.

+ Độ dày thông dụng: 9mm, 12mm, 18mm, 25mm

+ Ứng dụng: Gia công phần thô đồ nội thất gia đình, văn phòng, quảng cáo, làm cốt cho phủ MFC, PVC … làm lớp cốt hoàn thiện tốt cho nhiều loại vật liệu hoàn thiện bao gồm cả sơn các loại.

phân loại các loại gỗ công nghiệp - gỗ ván dăm

phân loại các loại gỗ công nghiệp – gỗ ván dăm

  1. Gỗ MDF: Medium Density Fiberboar

+ Cấu tạo: Gỗ tự nhiên loại thường, nghiền mịn, trộn với keo chuyên dụng và ép gia cường theo qui cách.

+ Tính chất: Không nứt, không co ngót,  ít mối mọt, tương đối mềm, chịu lực yếu, dễ gia công. Bề mặt có độ phẳng mịn cao. Loại chịu ẩm thường có lõi màu xanh lá hơi lá cây

+ Độ dày thông dụng: 3mm, 4mm, 5mm, 6mm, 9mm, 12mm,15mm, 17mm,  18mm, 20mm, 25mm

+ Ứng dụng: Gia công phần thô đồ nội thất gia đình, văn phòng, quảng cáo, làm cốt cho phủ MFC, PVC … làm lớp cốt hoàn thiện rất tốt cho nhiều loại vật liệu hoàn thiện bao gồm cả sơn các loại.

phân loại các loại gỗ công nghiệp-gỗ MDF

phân loại các loại gỗ công nghiệp – gỗ MDF

  1. Gỗ HDF: High Density Fiberboar 

+ Cấu tạo: Gỗ tự nhiên loại thường, nghiền mịn, trộn với keo chuyên dụng và ép gia cường với độ ép rất cao.

+ Tính chất: Không nứt, không co ngót, rất cứng, chịu nước, chịu nhiệt khá tốt.

+ Độ dày thông dụng: 3mm, 6mm, 9mm, 12mm,15mm, 17mm,  18mm, 20mm, 25mm

+ Ứng dụng: Gia công phần thô đồ nội thất cao cấp, làm cốt ván sàn gỗ công nghiệp …

phân loại các loại gỗ công nghiệp-gỗ HDF

phân loại các loại gỗ công nghiệp-gỗ HDF

  1. Gỗ MFC Melamine

+ Cấu tạo: Lớp Melamine chịu nhiệt, cứng, có màu sắc, họa tiết phong phú được ép lên bề mặt gỗ VÁN DĂM hoặc MDF

+ Tính chất: Bề mặt chống chầy xước, chịu nhiệt rất tốt. Có loại phủ Melamine 1 mặt và 2 mặt

+ Độ dày thông dụng: 18mm, 25mm. Các độ dày khác là tùy vào đặt hàng, có thể làm MFC 1 mặt. Ván MFC còn có kích thước tiêu chuẩn khác : 1830mm Rộng x 2440mm x 18mm/25mm Dày

+ Ứng dụng: Gia công đồ nội thất, đặc biệt là nội thất văn phòng. Nhược điểm là hạn chế tạo dáng sản phẩm, sử lý cạnh và ghép nối. Cạnh chủ yếu hoàn thiện bằng nẹp nhựa sử dụng máy dán cạnh chuyên dụng.

phân loại các loại gỗ công nghiệp-gỗ MFC Melamine

phân loại các loại gỗ công nghiệp-gỗ MFC Melamine

  1. Gỗ Veneer 

+ Cấu tạo: Là gỗ tự nhiên được bóc thành lớp mỏng từ 0,3 – 1mm rộng 130-180mm. Thông thường được ép lên bề mặt gỗ dán plywood dày 3mm

+ Tính chất: Bản chất bề mặt cấu tạo là gỗ thịt, phù hợp với mọi công nghệ hoàn thiện bề mặt. Độ cứng phụ thuộc nhiều vào sử lý PU bề mặt.

+ Độ dày thông dụng: tấm ép sẵn 3mm hoặc có thể theo đặt hàng.

+ Ứng dụng: Là vật liệu hoàn thiện rất đẹp cho nhiều sản phẩm nội thất. Giống gỗ tự nhiên, giá thành cạnh tranh, tạo hình phong phú

phân loại các loại gỗ công nghiệp-gỗ veneer

phân loại các loại gỗ công nghiệp-gỗ veneer

  1. Gỗ nhựa

+ Cấu tạo: Đây là một loại vật liệu được tạo thành từ bột nhựa PVC với một số chất phụ gia làm đầy có gốc cellulose hoặc vô cơ

+ Tính chất: Chịu ẩm tốt, nhẹ, dễ gia công

+ Độ dày thông dụng: 5mm, 9mm, 12mm, 18mm

+ Ứng dụng: Gia công đồ nội thất gia đình, văn phòng, quảng cáo, làm cốt phủ các loại Acrylic

phân loại các loại gỗ công nghiệp-gỗ nhựa

phân loại các loại gỗ công nghiệp-gỗ nhựa

  1. Gỗ ghép

+ Cấu tạo: Những thanh gỗ nhỏ ( thường gỗ cao su, gỗ thông, gỗ xoan, gỗ keo, gỗ quế, gỗ trẩu) sử dụng công nghệ ghép lại với nhau thành tấm

+ Tính chất: Rất gần với các đặc điểm của gỗ tự nhiên

+ Độ dày thông dụng: 12mm, 18mm

+ Ứng dụng: Sản xuất đồ nội thất gia đình và văn phòng. 

phân loại các loại gỗ công nghiệp-gỗ ghép

phân loại các loại gỗ công nghiệp-gỗ ghép

    9. Ván TỔ ONG

+ Cấu tạo: Sử dụng công nghệ tao ra sản phẩm có độ dày từ 38mm-50mm,  trọng lượng nhẹ

+ Tính chất: Nhẹ, chịu lực khá tốt bởi cấu tạo tổ ong

+ Độ dày thông dụng: 38mm, 50mm

+ Ứng dụng: Gia công đồ nội thất, cánh cửa, vách ngăn cách âm…

phân loại các loại gỗ công nghiệp-ván tổ ong

phân loại các loại gỗ công nghiệp-ván tổ ong

Nguồn: Sưu tầm

How to make a simple wall clock

How to make a simple wall clock

However it has planted a seed of craziness as now I want to turn every boring household object into a simple wall clock. I’ll try and refrain.

How to make a simple wall clock - Final

How to make a simple wall clock – Final

You’ll need…

  • A round wooden chopping board (mine was 30cm in diameter)
  • Black leather strap or an old belt
  • Leather punch
  • Clock mechanism (make sure it will go through the wood thickness fully)
  • 2 small shallow brass screws
  • Power drill
  • Drill bit slightly bigger than the clock mechanism screw and a smaller drill bit for your screws
  • Pencil & ruler
  • Screwdriver
How to make a simple wall clock - Step 1

How to make a simple wall clock – Step 1

This is a very rare occasion where I got our power drill out but not without my husband’s supervision mind. Me being left alone with power tools would be asking for trouble when I could probably wound myself in a padded cell. Please do take a moment to appreciate my creepy double jointed thumb in the image below.

How to make a simple wall clock - Step 2

How to make a simple wall clock – Step 2

To make…

  1. Measure and mark the centre point point on your wooden chopping board with your pencil and ruler.
  2. Consider a stable surface to drill on where you will able to go all the way through. I laid the chopping board on two of our flat chairs with a gap in between. Drill the centre point the whole way through, holding steady.
  3. Cut a strip of the black leather to the length you want. Try holding it on the chopping board to see how long you need it. Trim the edges neatly and then make a hole in either end using the leather punch. Make sure the punch size fits the brass screws that will eventually go in.
  4. Then mark on the chopping board edge, where you want each screw to be fixed. I did this halfway on either side. At this stage use your drill again, with a smaller drill bit just to ever so slightly drill these points. This will give a small dip for your screws, making it much easier for them to go in.
  5. Place one leather end over the drilled dip, place your screw in and twist with a screw driver until the screw is flush to the leather (leather secure between the wood and the screw). Repeat on the other side.
  6. Thread your clock mechanism through the central hole in the chopping board and follow the instructions you received to put it all together with the hands. There will usually be a washer you need to tighten to stop it all coming apart.
  7. Get yourself a battery and hang your clock in pride of place!
How to make a simple wall clock - Step 3

How to make a simple wall clock – Step 3

All those tools might sound a little intimidating but if I can do it, you guys definitely can! It’s simple, chic and will be a welcome addition to any room.  I’m so looking forward to sharing another affordable home tip with you tomorrow!

How to make a simple wall clock

How to make a simple wall clock

How To Turn An Old LP Into Unique Wall Clock

How To Turn An Old LP Into Unique Wall Clock

 You Need

– An old LP (the Long Play)
– A clock movement.
– Clock hands.
– Tools

Depending how you get your movement you might need a screwdriver.

Instructions

1. Choose your record. I chose records that had colourful branding because they would be the only colour and detail on my wall clock.

How To Turn An Old LP Into Unique Wall Clock - Step 1

You will need an old LP, a clock movement with hands.

2. If you wanted to add detail to the LP/clock face, numbers, dots or dashes, you would add them to the face before you add the movement. I liked the face of the record plain so I skipped straight to the next step.

3. Find a clock movement. You can buy these from craft stores or you can pick up secondhand clocks and use their movements. They are usually pretty easy to access.

How To Turn An Old LP Into Unique Wall Clock - Step 2

The movement slips through the hole in the middle of the LP.

4. If your movement doesn’t come with hands you’ll need to find some you like, or if you’re super keen make your own. They are sized to fit over different levels over the movement.

5. Since the records already have a hole right in the centre it was super easy to slip the movement through. It was a squeeze but with some twisting it slipped through and sat about a centimetre off the LP.

How To Turn An Old LP Into Unique Wall Clock - Step 3

Make sure the movement is secure and working.

6. The hands I had came with the movement so they looped right over the top. I tested the hands to make sure they moved freely without knocking each other or touching the record face and had to bend some of them to give them room.

7. Once the hands are secured you can add your battery and watch it tick! Check that everything works by watching a complete cycle.

How To Turn An Old LP Into Unique Wall Clock - Step 4

Secure the hands, add your battery an set the time.

8. There were no hooks on my movement but there is space to add one or you can stick some heavy duty removable tape to the back and hang it that way.

How To Turn An Old LP Into Unique Wall Clock

How To Turn An Old LP Into Unique Wall Clock Final

Additional Notes:

The LPs do attract dust but they are easy enough to clean. If you want a smaller unique wall clock try an old 45 or CD.

How to make Color Block Wall Clock

How to make Color Block Wall Clock

There are thounsands things you can buy to decorate your room. But you can do somethings simple and awesome by yourself very easily. One of things is a color block clock.

How to make Color Block Wall Clock

How to make Color Block Wall Clock – Tools

Tools: Materials (makes 3 clocks!):

– 3 cork trivets ($7 for all three on Amazon)
– 3 hanging clock kits ($7 per kit on Amazon)
– Liquitex Basics Acrylic Bright Aqua Green ($4 on Blick Art Materials)
– Liquitex Basics Acrylic Cadmium Orange ($4 on Blick Art Materials)
– Liquitex Basics Acrylic Phthalocyanine Blue ($4 on Blick Art Materials)
– Liquitex Basics Acrylic Bright Yellow Green ($4 on Blick Art Materials)
– Liquitex Basics Acrylic Naphthol Crimson ($4 on Blick Art Materials)
– Liquitex Basics Acrylic Light Blue Violet ($4 on Blick Art Materials)

– power drill
– painter’s tape
– paint brushes
– scissors
– mixing palette (a paper plate is fine)
– water cup
– paper towels

Instructions:

1. Spray paint your clock hands the color of your choosing and let dry.

2. Measure the center of your cork trivet to determine where the clock hands should be placed. Mark this point with an “X” and drill a hole with your power tool large enough to fit the clock part. Wipe away any debris.

3. Tape off your cork trivets to create the shapes you want to paint on your clock and smooth out to prevent any color bleeding.

4. Paint each complementary color in the desired shape on your cork trivet.

5. Mix your complementary colors together until colors are well blended. Paint new third color in the desired shape on your cork trivet. Let dry. Add two or three coats of paint depending on the color.

6. Once clocks have dried, slowly peel away tape away from the cork trivet. Use your paint brush to touch up any spaces you’d like more filled in.

7. Assemble clocks by inserting clock back and hands on each clock. Now it’s ready to hang on your wall! 

How to make Color Block Wall Clock - Step 1

How to make Color Block Wall Clock – Step 1

First off, we’re going to change up each clock color. Take just the hands out of each kit and spray paint whichever color you like. We went with black, white, and left one pair gold.

How to make Color Block Wall Clock - Step 2

How to make Color Block Wall Clock – Step 2

Next up, you’ll need to use a drill to make holes in each trivet for your clock. Use a ruler to measure the center of each trivet. Drill there!

How to make Color Block Wall Clock - Step 3

How to make Color Block Wall Clock – Step 3

Now it’s time to get creative. Use painter’s tape to make geometric designs, stripes, and the like. As you can see in the background, we used a spare piece of cork to test out our color palettes and designs. You can also do this on a piece of paper.

How to make Color Block Wall Clock - Step 4

How to make Color Block Wall Clock – Step 4

For our first color combo, we’ll combine blue and yellow green to make teal!

How to make Color Block Wall Clock - Step 5

How to make Color Block Wall Clock – Step 5

Next up, orange and aqua green. How cool is the gray color that results?

How to make Color Block Wall Clock - Step 6

How to make Color Block Wall Clock – Step 6

Last, red and light blue violet. Don’t forget to paint those sides! We recommend doing 2-3 coats of paint, depending on the color.

How to make Color Block Wall Clock - Step 7

How to make Color Block Wall Clock – Step 7

Now the best part ever. The peel and reveal! Peel off the tape and revel at those clean lines and bright color blocks. Use a paint brush to fill in any gaps as needed.

How to make Color Block Wall Clock - Step 8

How to make Color Block Wall Clock – Step 8

Okay, maybe this is the best part ever?

How to make Color Block Wall Clock - Step 9

How to make Color Block Wall Clock – Step 9

It seriously takes 2 minutes to assemble a clock. Don’t be surprised if you find yourself gifting clocks to all of your friends and family after making this project.

How to make Color Block Wall Clock - Step 10

How to make Color Block Wall Clock – Step 10

And there you have it!

How to make Color Block Wall Clock - Final

How to make Color Block Wall Clock – Final

If you’ve got loved ones in far away places, you could also make each clock a different time zone, a la our Hoop Clocks.

How to make Color Block Wall Clock - Overall

How to make Color Block Wall Clock – Overall

 

How to make Color Block Wall Clock

How to make Color Block Wall Clock

 

How to make Color Block Wall Clock

Which color combo is your favorite?

How to make Color Block Wall Clock

What does your workspace look like? Any DIY projects on the wall or on your desk? Tell us in the comments below.