AOC Craft Vietnam JSC

Sweet pop cards

AOC Craft Vietnam JSC

How to make envelope handmade

Today we show u how to make DIY cute envelopes for cute gifts. 

Envelope handmade: Prepare

  • paper (color)
  • hard paper
  • ribbon/thread

  • glue
  • scissor
  • pin or small nail.

Now we start to do it

Step 1: Print ( or redraw) and cut the pattern

Sample 1 ( size A5)

phong bì 1

Sample 2 (size A4 & A7)

phong bì 3 phong bì 2

Cut some circles.

phong bì 4

Step 2: Fixed circle by pin (or small nail ) as shown

phong bì 5

Step 3: Fold the left edge, fixed with glue

Fixed circle as step 2

Winding to sealed envelope

phong bì 6

Finish:

phong bì 7

 

Let do it yourself! Good luck!

 

( Via: Internet )

A Brief History of the Pop-Up Book

Books contain tremendous power. They captivate our minds, change the way we look at the world, and transport us to faraway lands. It seems hardly possible to make books any richer than they already are. However, through the beauty of illustrations and the mechanics of pop-up books, readers of all ages can find an even greater appreciation for literature.

The Beginnings of Paper Mechanics

1

The first “pop-up” was more of a machine than book. It was invented by Ramon Llull (ca. 1232-1315), a writer, theologian, and mathematician, who later became a martyr in the Roman Catholic Church. Called a “Lullian Circle,” the device was composed of several revolving, affixed circles each annotating an ideal. The separate paper discs featured their own specific category such as: knowledge, verbs, and adjectives. The circles were cut out and fastened together so that they could rotate upon each other as needed. According to Llull, there were a finite number of truths in all areas of knowledge. He believed that the various combinations in the Lullian Circle would reveal truths in all areas of inquiry. 

The fourteenth century saw a rise in movable books, particularly the “turn-up” style. These volumes became especially popular for medical students learning human anatomy. One of the most highly praised was printed by Andreas Vesalius in 1543. In his book, De Humani Corporis Fabrica Librorum Epitome, Vesalius not only shared his immense anatomical knowledge with readers, but displayed a beautiful regard for illustrations which continues to be upheld to this day.

2 

It was not until much later—the late 1700s—that books were introduced solely for children’s entertainment. With the creation of children’s literature by John Newbery, publishers were encouraged to find new ways to appeal to their younger audience. In 1765, Robert Sayer created a movable book known as the “lift-the-flap” style. In this method, a paper was folded into four parts with each section illustrated. Then, at the top and bottom of the initial sheet, was a glued sheet containing text and pictures. This top sheet was then cut horizontally in the middle so that the picture beneath would be exposed after lifting the flaps masking it. The popularity of these books quickly grew and acquired different names depending on the content or composition of the illustrations. These names included: “metamorphoses”, “harlequinades”, and “toilet books”.  

In the 1800s, readers were introduced to a new style of book in which the illustrations could be removed. Most common were paper dolls that could be dressed up or down in accordance with the story, or pages that could be removed and propped up while reading. During this age, novels that were originally written for adult audiences, such as Gulliver’s Travels (1726) and Robinson Crusoe (1719), were being illustrated with a younger audience in mind as publishing houses sought to expand their markets. 

By 1860, movable books began to be produced on a mass scale. Dean & Son publishing company was the first to do so. They hired several artists to create new kinds of movable books and pictures. This led to the newest – and perhaps greatest – movable method, utilizing ribbons as a buttress to hold the images up on the page and project the scene–making it come alive.

3

It is also important to acknowledge the genius of Lothar Meggendorfer who made an appearance at the same time. Meggendorfer is highly honored for his incredibly complex animations. He made it possible for the pull of a tab to animate an entire scene, for example a dinner party’s eyes, jaws, arms, and legs could move all at once. Meggendorfer is credited for engineering and illustrating over 200 works, including the scene above. 

A Modern View of Pop-Ups

The 1900s saw the creation of yet another kind of movable book, one very similar to the pop-up books of today. With the expertise of S. Louis Giraud, the simple action of turning a page brought illustrations alive, visible from all angles. Another feat was the increase of affordable pop-up books through the use of mass-production and inexpensive materials. By the 1940s, Blue Ribbon Publishing of New York had made its name and coined the phrase “pop-up book.”

4

In the mid-1900s, the publication of pop-up books was on the decline until artist Voitech Kubasta designed pop-up books for his employer in Prague. Kubasta’s beautiful books did not go unnoticed; however, the Warsaw Pact prevented the United States from importing the books from Czechoslovakia. Not wanting to miss an opportunity, American publisher Waldo Hunt began his own company, Graphics International, and manufactured his own pop-ups. He was so successful in revitalizing the genre that Publisher’s Weekly named him “the father of the modern pop-up book industry.” His firm, Intervisual Communications (ICI), creates many of the movable books sold in the present day.

Via: Bookstellyouwhy.com

Base for origamic architecture design

Designing origamic architecture is not hard, but it does take a lot of time and patience. The art form has as many possibilities and your imagination is the limit. This mini lesson will take you through the beginning steps of designing origamic architecture.

Most common in OA are houses and buildings: these are easy (relatively speaking) in that they are linear. Cutting straight lines with an X-acto knife and a ruler is straightforward. Be careful though, X-acto knives are sharp and you wouldn’t want to hurt yourself or slice too long a line.

OA which have domes, curls, or swirls are made the same way as linear cuts. However, they are more challenging because you need to manage your knife with good control. In many ways, you are like a surgeon. This mini lesson will not address these rounded cuts, but you may try them yourself.

Designing Origamic Architecture: Exercise 1

ex1

To begin, let’s try an easy pop-up card that you can make with scissors. Fold a piece of paper in half and cut two notches (step 1). Valley fold and then unfold the flap of paper (step 2 & 3). Open the paper and push the flap inwards so that it lies in between the folded sheet (step 4). Make sure that the flap folds along the crease made in step 2. 

There you go, your first pop-up box! An OA expert would draw the pattern as shown on the right.

The black line across the middle of the sheet represents the fold line: this is where the paper is folded in half to make the card.
The vertical black lines represent the places where you cut.
The blue line represent valley folds.
The red line represent mountain folds.
Other artists may use slightly different notation, but the idea will be similar.

Designing Origamic Architecture: Exercise 2

ex2            ex2.1

Let’s add another box on top of the box pop-up made above. To do this, cut two notches on the edge labeled A. Only cut the top folded sheet (if you cut all 2 layers, you will get three boxes). Repeat the folding sequence as in exercise 1. The result is a box on top of box.

The upper box will always be a little smaller than the bottom box. You can repeat this process to get stacks of boxes. The pattern (or diagram) is shown below.

Examine it carefully and confirm that the valley folds and mountain folds are as described. Be sure to understand the pattern because in the next exercises, we will no longer show the detailed instructions. All information will be compressed in one image: the pattern.

Designing Origamic Architecture: Exercise 3

ex3 Let’s try the same thing again but with the inner edge labeled B. Make an easy pop up box as in exercise 1. Open the card slightly, jam scissors between the sheets and cut two notches in the inner folded edge B. Valley fold and unfold this new flap. Push the small flap towards the back of the card.

ex3.1 

Now it looks like a chair with wide armrests. The pattern is shown on the right. If you repeat the exercise using the edge labeled C, you will get a small box in front of the original big box. This is the same as the result of exercise 2 flipped over. 

 

ex3.2

Designing Origamic Architecture: Exercise 4

There are other variations you can try, but let’s move away from the boxy pop-up. Imagine that you want a box that is flat like a shirt-gift box. Namely, it is short and deep.

ex4 To make the box short, the cut above the fold line (A) should be short. And, to make the box deep, the cut below the fold line (B) should be long. Because the lengths of the cuts above and below the fold line are not the same, you can’t use scissors anymore. Time to move on to the X-acto knife.

ex4.1 Make the cuts with an X-acto knife and push the flap so that it lies in between the folded paper. You will need to make valley folds at the blue lines. In order for the pop-up to look like a gift-box, the height at the front of the box (H) must be the same as the height of the cut above the fold line (A). Since you can measure A, you can determine the exact location of the mountain fold (red line)

An OA expert would proceed this way: – draw the lines where cuts and folds will occur, – make the cuts, – make the necessary folds one by one, and then – collapse the pop-up into its final shape.

Turn this pop-up upside down. Now you have a building found in many OA designs. Make a dome roof, cut out windows and doors: congratulations, you’ve made your first building! 

ex4.2

Designing Origamic Architecture: Exercise 5

ex5

Consider the shirt gift-box above. Let’s make this box skinny so we have room to add other elements in the pop-up. Let’s make a few more boxes beside it. Let’s make it exciting my making the other boxes bigger and bigger. Better yet, let’s push the boxes side by side. Now it looks like a staircase.

ex5.1 The pattern for the staircase is show on the right. Copy this onto your paper, make the cuts using an X-acto knife. Use a creasing tool to help you make all the valley and mountain folds. Collapse the model and you have a staircase!

Careful examination of the staircase will show that you didn’t need to cut each step all the way down to the base of the paper. You can modify your pattern and make a more sturdy staircase.

ex5.2

phân loại các loại gỗ công nghiệp - gỗ nhựa

Phân loại các loại gỗ công nghiệp

  1. Gỗ dán (Plywood):

+ Cấu tạo: Nhiều lớp gỗ mỏng ~1mm ép chồng vuông góc với nhau bằng keo chuyên dụng

+ Tính chất: Không nứt, không co ngót, ít mối mọt, chịu lực cao. Có gỗ dán thường, gỗ dán chịu nước phủ phim, phủ keo. Bề mặt thường không phẳng nhẵn

+ Độ dày thông dụng: 3mm, 5mm, 6mm, 8mm, 10mm, 12mm, 15mm, 18mm, 20mm, 25mm

+ Ứng dụng: Gia công phần thô đồ nội thất gia đình, văn phòng, quảng cáo, làm lõi cho bề mặt veneer. Loại chịu nước làm copha, gia cố ngoài trời…

phân loại các loại gỗ công nghiệp-gỗ dán

phân loại các loại gỗ công nghiệp – gỗ dán

  1. Gỗ ván dăm (OKAL):

+ Cấu tạo: Gỗ tự nhiên xay thành dăm, trộn với keo chuyên dụng và ép gia cường theo quy cách.

+ Tính chất: Không co ngót,  ít mối mọt, chịu lực vừa phải. Bề mặt có độ phẳng mịn tương đối cao. Loại thường các cạnh rất dễ bị sứt mẻ, chịu ẩm tương đối kém. Loại chịu ẩm thường có lõi màu xanh.

+ Độ dày thông dụng: 9mm, 12mm, 18mm, 25mm

+ Ứng dụng: Gia công phần thô đồ nội thất gia đình, văn phòng, quảng cáo, làm cốt cho phủ MFC, PVC … làm lớp cốt hoàn thiện tốt cho nhiều loại vật liệu hoàn thiện bao gồm cả sơn các loại.

phân loại các loại gỗ công nghiệp - gỗ ván dăm

phân loại các loại gỗ công nghiệp – gỗ ván dăm

  1. Gỗ MDF: Medium Density Fiberboar

+ Cấu tạo: Gỗ tự nhiên loại thường, nghiền mịn, trộn với keo chuyên dụng và ép gia cường theo qui cách.

+ Tính chất: Không nứt, không co ngót,  ít mối mọt, tương đối mềm, chịu lực yếu, dễ gia công. Bề mặt có độ phẳng mịn cao. Loại chịu ẩm thường có lõi màu xanh lá hơi lá cây

+ Độ dày thông dụng: 3mm, 4mm, 5mm, 6mm, 9mm, 12mm,15mm, 17mm,  18mm, 20mm, 25mm

+ Ứng dụng: Gia công phần thô đồ nội thất gia đình, văn phòng, quảng cáo, làm cốt cho phủ MFC, PVC … làm lớp cốt hoàn thiện rất tốt cho nhiều loại vật liệu hoàn thiện bao gồm cả sơn các loại.

phân loại các loại gỗ công nghiệp-gỗ MDF

phân loại các loại gỗ công nghiệp – gỗ MDF

  1. Gỗ HDF: High Density Fiberboar 

+ Cấu tạo: Gỗ tự nhiên loại thường, nghiền mịn, trộn với keo chuyên dụng và ép gia cường với độ ép rất cao.

+ Tính chất: Không nứt, không co ngót, rất cứng, chịu nước, chịu nhiệt khá tốt.

+ Độ dày thông dụng: 3mm, 6mm, 9mm, 12mm,15mm, 17mm,  18mm, 20mm, 25mm

+ Ứng dụng: Gia công phần thô đồ nội thất cao cấp, làm cốt ván sàn gỗ công nghiệp …

phân loại các loại gỗ công nghiệp-gỗ HDF

phân loại các loại gỗ công nghiệp-gỗ HDF

  1. Gỗ MFC Melamine

+ Cấu tạo: Lớp Melamine chịu nhiệt, cứng, có màu sắc, họa tiết phong phú được ép lên bề mặt gỗ VÁN DĂM hoặc MDF

+ Tính chất: Bề mặt chống chầy xước, chịu nhiệt rất tốt. Có loại phủ Melamine 1 mặt và 2 mặt

+ Độ dày thông dụng: 18mm, 25mm. Các độ dày khác là tùy vào đặt hàng, có thể làm MFC 1 mặt. Ván MFC còn có kích thước tiêu chuẩn khác : 1830mm Rộng x 2440mm x 18mm/25mm Dày

+ Ứng dụng: Gia công đồ nội thất, đặc biệt là nội thất văn phòng. Nhược điểm là hạn chế tạo dáng sản phẩm, sử lý cạnh và ghép nối. Cạnh chủ yếu hoàn thiện bằng nẹp nhựa sử dụng máy dán cạnh chuyên dụng.

phân loại các loại gỗ công nghiệp-gỗ MFC Melamine

phân loại các loại gỗ công nghiệp-gỗ MFC Melamine

  1. Gỗ Veneer 

+ Cấu tạo: Là gỗ tự nhiên được bóc thành lớp mỏng từ 0,3 – 1mm rộng 130-180mm. Thông thường được ép lên bề mặt gỗ dán plywood dày 3mm

+ Tính chất: Bản chất bề mặt cấu tạo là gỗ thịt, phù hợp với mọi công nghệ hoàn thiện bề mặt. Độ cứng phụ thuộc nhiều vào sử lý PU bề mặt.

+ Độ dày thông dụng: tấm ép sẵn 3mm hoặc có thể theo đặt hàng.

+ Ứng dụng: Là vật liệu hoàn thiện rất đẹp cho nhiều sản phẩm nội thất. Giống gỗ tự nhiên, giá thành cạnh tranh, tạo hình phong phú

phân loại các loại gỗ công nghiệp-gỗ veneer

phân loại các loại gỗ công nghiệp-gỗ veneer

  1. Gỗ nhựa

+ Cấu tạo: Đây là một loại vật liệu được tạo thành từ bột nhựa PVC với một số chất phụ gia làm đầy có gốc cellulose hoặc vô cơ

+ Tính chất: Chịu ẩm tốt, nhẹ, dễ gia công

+ Độ dày thông dụng: 5mm, 9mm, 12mm, 18mm

+ Ứng dụng: Gia công đồ nội thất gia đình, văn phòng, quảng cáo, làm cốt phủ các loại Acrylic

phân loại các loại gỗ công nghiệp-gỗ nhựa

phân loại các loại gỗ công nghiệp-gỗ nhựa

  1. Gỗ ghép

+ Cấu tạo: Những thanh gỗ nhỏ ( thường gỗ cao su, gỗ thông, gỗ xoan, gỗ keo, gỗ quế, gỗ trẩu) sử dụng công nghệ ghép lại với nhau thành tấm

+ Tính chất: Rất gần với các đặc điểm của gỗ tự nhiên

+ Độ dày thông dụng: 12mm, 18mm

+ Ứng dụng: Sản xuất đồ nội thất gia đình và văn phòng. 

phân loại các loại gỗ công nghiệp-gỗ ghép

phân loại các loại gỗ công nghiệp-gỗ ghép

    9. Ván TỔ ONG

+ Cấu tạo: Sử dụng công nghệ tao ra sản phẩm có độ dày từ 38mm-50mm,  trọng lượng nhẹ

+ Tính chất: Nhẹ, chịu lực khá tốt bởi cấu tạo tổ ong

+ Độ dày thông dụng: 38mm, 50mm

+ Ứng dụng: Gia công đồ nội thất, cánh cửa, vách ngăn cách âm…

phân loại các loại gỗ công nghiệp-ván tổ ong

phân loại các loại gỗ công nghiệp-ván tổ ong

Nguồn: Sưu tầm