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3D BIRTHDAY BANNER

3D BIRTHDAY BANNER

3D BIRTHDAY BANNER 

A long time ago, I pinned this beautiful cake I’d come across by Sarah at Signe Sugar. I loved it so much, it inspired me to create this paper banner version. I had no idea how to go about it, so I just jumped into cutting, bending and gluing. Once I got the hang of it, it came together pretty quickly. And, if you mess up, it’s just paper – –  so just cut another piece and keep moving forward!

3D Birthday Banner

3D Birthday Banner

3D Birthday Banner DIY | Oh Happy Day!3D Birthday Banner DIY | Oh Happy Day!3D Birthday Banner DIY | Oh Happy Day!

Materials:

  • Card stock or heavyweight paper
  • Ruler
  • Paper cutting knife
  • Bone folder
  • Scissors
  • Glue
  • String
  • Mini hole punch.

3D Birthday Banner DIY | Oh Happy Day!

Step 1: Begin by cutting several strips of 8″ x 3″ paper.  To create tall, narrow letters, keep the inside pieces small. For example, for the “H,” begin with two 8″ x 3″ strips, and cut a 2″ x 3″ piece for the inside center piece.

Step 2: Draw a line of glue on the 3″ side of the small center piece.

Step 3: Attach it at a 90 degree angle to one 8″ x 3″ piece, about 2″ down from the top. Hold for a few seconds until the glue sets.

Step 4: Draw a thin line of glue on the top of the 3″ center piece, and gently attach another 8″ x 3″ strip, matching the first 8″ x 3″ strip. Continue in this way for the H, A, Y, I, T, H, A, and Y.

3D Birthday Banner DIY | Oh Happy Day!

Step 5: For letters that have curves, begin with your 8″ x 3″ strip. For the “P,” take a second strip approx. 7″ x 3″ and, with your bone folder, gently score a crease 1/2″ from the top. Fold gently 90 degrees. Flip this strip over and score 1/2″ down from the other end.

Step 6: Apply glue to the top of the creased strip.

Step 7: Glue the creased strip to the outside top of the flat 8″ x 3″ strip.

Step 8: Apply glue to the inside of the second creased 1/2″ fold. Gently bend the “P” shape and attach to the 8″ x 3″ strip about 3 1/2″ inches from the top of the letter. Press and hold for a few seconds. Continue in this way with the B, R, and D.

Step 9: Punch holes 1/2″ down from the FRONT top of each letter, on both left and right sides of the letter.

Step 10: Punch holes 1/2″ down from the BACK top of each letter, on both left and right sides of the letter.

Step 11: Line up your letters and thread string through each FRONT top hole of every letter.

Step 12: Thread string through each BACK top hole of every letter.

Step 13: Carefully hang the banner, adjusting the letters and the string to get the right tension and placement of the letters. Enjoy!

3D Birthday Banner DIY | Oh Happy Day!3D Birthday Banner DIY | Oh Happy Day!

DIY POP UP CARDS

DIY POP UP CARDS

I’ve been seeing a lot of pop-up cards around the web lately, all using very intricate, sometimes complicated folding and glueing techniques. Since I’m really more of the simple-diy-lover, I’ve put together a quick and versatile pop-up card tutorial. The idea is that you can use one basic technique for an endless amount of different pop-up cards.

Start with a simple card and fold it in half. Then cut parallel lines (in pairs of the same length) into the middle fold as shown in the picture. The cuts should be max half the length of the card (otherwise they’ll stand out when you close it). Push the flaps forward until your card looks like in the bottom picture.

Now start crafting the bits and pieces to display in your card. I made some balloons and a Good Luck sign for this one. Stick these with paper glue onto the front (not top) part of the folded out flaps. Now when you close your card, it’ll look like in the bottom left picture. Just take a 2nd card and glue it on to cover the outside.

Stick some more balloons, or whatever it is you’re crafting, onto the flaps and voilà – you’re done. You could still add a background to the top and bottom halves. Stick on some clouds in the top part, some grass in the lower one for example.

In the same way you can also create text cards (Happy Birthday), fields of flowers or rows of trees. These would be great for birthday’s, graduation, Father’s Day or really just about anything.

All photos by Michaela for Oh Happy Day.

Via at http://ohhappyday.com

Pop-Up Mother's Day Card

Pop-Up Mother’s Day Card

INTRODUCTION

For moms near and far, this gorgeous greeting card makes for a special flower delivery. A flat card blooms into a three-dimensional arrangement that’s much more unexpected than a vase of roses. It looks intricate but takes only some snippets of paper and cleverly placed tape to create.

This project may seem complicated at first glance, but once you follow the instructions here, you’ll realize just how easy it is to re-create.

Pop-Up Mother's Day Card

Pop-Up Mother's Day Card

Pop-Up Mother's Day Card

Pop-Up Mother's Day Card

Pop-Up Mother's Day Card

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PATTERN 

download free pattern here

MATERIALS

  • Text-weight paper

  • Glue stick

  • Double-sided tape

  • Card stock

STEPS

  1. Cut seven 4-inch squares of paper in desired colors. Fold a square into quarters. Fold down 1 flap diagonally; flip the square of paper over and fold down the other flap, forming a triangle as shown. Print petal template; trace it onto the triangle, and cut out. Unfold, and cut 1 petal from flower; close gap by overlapping petals on either side and securing with glue stick. Repeat with other squares. 

  2. Attach pieces of double-sided tape to petals, as indicated by dots. Start sticking flowers to one another: Flowers B and C each overlap a petal with A; then flower D goes on top, completely overlapping A.

  3. Attach flowers E and F to the stack to overlap B and C.

  4. Attach G to the top, overlapping D. Cut out some freehand leaves from green paper, place double-sided tape on the bottom, and attach them to the flowers.

  5. Cut a piece of card stock into a 10-by-6-inch rectangle, and fold in half to form a card. Place the folded flower stack inside of the opened card as shown. Place a piece of double-sided tape as shown; close card, and press firmly to adhere. Open card and repeat, attaching the other side of the flower stack to the inside of the card.

    Via at: http://www.marthastewart.com

Ideas for Valentine’s Day Window Cards

Ideas for Window Valentine’s Day Cards

A slight variation from stencil cards is window cards.  Instead of cutting a shape in a stencil, you can cut the shapes or text directly on the front cover of the Valentine’s Day cards.  You can decorate your card behind the mirror in a number of ways, such as putting sentimental photos, some patterned paper, or even some meaningful words.  We made a variety of window cards with different shapes and patterns.  Here’s a look at the cards we made:

Ideas for Valentine’s Day Window Cards

Ideas for Window Valentine’s Day Cards

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[dt_sc_one_third]Ideas for Valentine’s Day Window Cards[/dt_sc_one_third]
[dt_sc_one_third]Ideas for Valentine’s Day Window Cards[/dt_sc_one_third]

The cards in the top row have heart windows that we filled with pictures of our baby daughter. The bottom row has simple elegant rose cut out windows.

These are the 3 simple instructions on how to make window Valentine’s Day cards.

Step 1:

Draw the heart shapes on the front of the card using a pencil (draw lightly as you will need to erase any pencil marks that remains after cutting).  You can also use stencils to draw your heart. 

Follow the first step of the instructions in the Stencil Card section above to make your own stencil.  You can also draw other shapes such as flowers, balloons or square windows.  If you do not want to draw directly on your card, draw your pattern on a sheet of paper, and use this as a template to cut through your card. 

Tape or use repositionable glue to attach the template to your card.

Step 2:

If your pattern is large enough, you can use scissors to cut the window out.  If your pattern is small or complex, then you will want to use an X-Acto knife to cut the shapes out.  I’d recommend cutting your card on a self-healing mat or something you don’t mind cutting up (old magazine, stack of paper, phone book), so you do not damage your table top.

Step 3:

Finish the card by decorating the card behind the window.  Here are some creative ideas of things to put behind the window:  a photo; patterned paper, text, stenciled shapes, chocolate hearts or kisses.

Ideas for Valentine’s Day Stencil Cards

Using stencils is a great way to create hearts on the front of your card.  There are two general ways to use stencils.  You can cut a hole and color inside the hole, or cut a shape and color around the shape.  You can be very creative with the way you color inside or around your stencil.  You can use almost any media such as spray paint, spray inks, markers, pastels, acrylics, watercolor, glitter…the possibilities are endless!  Try experimenting on some scrap paper to see which media you like best.  We had some fun making cards with stencils.  We made the cards below using stencils and spray paint.

 

 

We also used acrylic paint and stencils for a very simple brushed look.

   

Using a stencil heart, we created the cards below with a marker (left) and glue and glitter (right).

  

Here are instructions on how to use stencil techniques to decorate your Valentine’s Day card.

1. Create a stencil by cutting out your desired shapes in a piece of paper or card stock.  To make hearts, fold your cardstock or paper in half and cut half a heart along the crease.  Now you can use the heart hole or the heart itself as a stencil.  If you’re using the heart hole as a stencil, then make sure that the entire stencil is larger than your card so you don’t get any of your colors where you don’t want them to be.  I find that using a paper stencil works better than cardboard.

2. This step is optional but I find it helpful.  Use repositionable glue or spray (Krylon Easy Tact Spray) to attach the stencil to your card.  This helps prevent colors from getting underneath your stencil, especially if you use a spray paint.  You can also use some double-sided tape, but you want to be very careful not to tear your card while removing the stencil.  To reduce the stickiness of the tape, I sometimes stick it to my clothes to get some lint stuck on it first.

3. Use your chosen media to color inside or around your stencil.  Make sure you do not color underneath your stencil.  This may take some practice to get the perfect look.  You can even try to mix different media: acrylic and glitter, spray paint and pastel…etc.  You can even use both the window or shape stencil together with different sized hearts.

Here are other examples of stencil cards using acrylic paint from Bless This Mess and spray inks from Artful Kids.  The Crafty Crow used a very unique technique with Q-tips and stencils to make a Valentine’s day card.

Via at http://www.creativepopupcards.com

Ideas for Valentine’s Day Pop up Cards

I may be a little biased, but pop up cards are the most impressive types of Valentine’s Day cards to make for someone. That’s why my Rich makes them for me, because he’s always still finding ways to impress me! I find it so sweet!

The 3-dimensional nature of the card often surprises the person receiving the card when he or she opens it.   Pop up cards are more complex to make than normal cards, and requires a little more effort to make, but definitely well worth it as it tends to give a higher WOW factor! Within the category of pop up cards, there is a wide range of designs with varying levels of difficulty. The two most common Valentine’s Day pop up cards are the simple “Center Folded Heart Card” and the “90 Degree Stepped Heart Card”.   If you have children, these pop up cards are simple enough to make with them. They are wonderful craft ideas!

Center Folded Heart Card

This is what the “Center Folded Heart Card” looks like.

   

The cards on the left and center are made from 2 sheets of colored card stock.  The card on the right was made with one sheet of printed card stock.  To make the cards shown above, watch Rich’s tutorial below.

Here are step by step instructions on how to make the “Center Folded Heart Card”:

1. Fold a sheet of card stock in half.

2. Cut the shape of half a heart along the folded edge, leaving the edge of the heart furthest away from the center fold uncut.  The uncut section should be parallel with the center fold.

3.  Unfold the card and reverse the folds of the heart so that the center of the heart folds inwards when the card is closed.

4. Glue another piece of card stock to the outside off the card.

90 Degree Stepped Heart Card

The second most common Valentine’s Day pop up card is the “90 Degree Stepped Heart” card.  This is what the card looks like:

  

There are several different versions of this card.  Here is Rich’s video on how to make this card:

Here are step by step instructions on how to make the “90 Degree Stepped Heart Card”:

1. Fold a sheet of card stock in half.

2. Cut two slits of the same length perpendicular to the folded edge.

3. Unfold the card and reverse the folds of the “step” so that it folds inwards.

4. Cut out a heart shape from another piece of card stock and glue it to the “step” of the inside card.

5. Glue another piece of card sock to the outside of the card.

If you want to make a pop up card that is guaranteed to impress, then try making one of the unique pop up cards below!  Just click on the image for the tutorial.

  

 

After making such an impressive Valentine’s Day pop up card, you may be wondering how one would go about decorating the front cover of the card?  You can use some of the designs from the following cards to decorate your pop up card.  These designs are also great to make as a standalone card, with your personal message in the inside.

Via http://www.creativepopupcards.com

How to Make a Step Pop up Card and Mechanism

Step 1: Supplies and Prep

You’ll need two card blanks of the same size for the card face and the pop up card mechanism. The pop up card mechanism is made separately and is glued inside the card face. It’s best to use card blanks of the same color to camouflage the pop up mechanism somewhat.

To make stamped pop up elements you will need white cardstock and colored cardstock for mats.

Gather a variety of paper and cardstock that coordinate with the colors used in your card.

Step 2: Make Card Face

Use one of the card blanks to make the card face. The card face can be made using any technique you like; however, it is important that the card have a horizontal aspect to make the most effective use of the step pop up. Set aside the completed card face while you make the pop up.

The sample birthday card features serendipity squares that make good use of your paper scraps.

Step 3: Make pop up Elements

pop up elements are glued to the pop up steps/platforms. Anything that is flat and will fit inside the folded card can be used. For the sample card, a stamped, matted message card and a stamped cutout are used. Your matted message card should be about 1¼” to 1½” by 3¼” to 3½”. The cutout can be up to about 2″ square.

Tip:

  • Use felt-tip markers to color the stamped image and tiny rubber stamps to decorate the message card.

Step 4: Make Step pop up Card

Use the second folded card blank to make the pop up mechanism. To form the pop up steps/platforms, you will cut parallel slits from the folded edge of the card blank.

First, use the pencil and ruler to draw a line 1½” from the folded edge and parallel to it. Next, draw two vertical lines from the first line to the folded edge—they should be about 2½” apart and parallel to each other. The left line should be about ¾” from the left edge of the card blank.

About ¾” to the right of the first step, draw a second step. Draw a line 1¼” from the fold with vertical parallel lines that are ¾” apart.

Tip:

  • For a simpler pop up, only make the first step. It can be drawn anywhere along the fold, but no closer than ¾” from either side.
  • Skip the measuring by using templates. See the side bar to the right for details.

Cut on the vertical lines from the folded edge to the drawn horizontal line.

Fold the cut steps on the horizontal line between the cut lines. Unfold.

Open the card blank and push the steps through to the other side. With the pencil lines on the outside, fold the card blank at a 90° angle. You will be gluing the pop up elements to these steps/platforms.

Step 5: Test pop up Card

Test your pop up mechanism by making sure it folds flat. Also, use repositionable tape or glue to attach the pop up elements to the pop up steps. Fold the pop up flat and make sure the pop up elements do not extend beyond the edges of the folded card.

Make any adjustments needed before proceeding.

Step 6: Glue Together

Glue the pop up mechanism inside the card face, being sure to align the edges. Apply glue to one side of the pop up, avoiding the step, and slip it inside the card face. Apply glue to the other side and fold the card face over onto it.

Open the card and allow the glue to dry.

Step 7: Glue pop up Elements and Finish Card

Glue the pop up elements to the steps. Decorate the card behind and around the pop up steps. You might stamp more images of the cutout, add a greeting or write a message. Use your imagination!

That’s it! Your pop up card is done!

Via: auntannie.com

Draw pattern sweet home pop up card in corel draw

Draw pattern sweet home pop up card in corel draw

For more tutorials, videos or patterns, please follow and check out website at http://aoccraft.com/
Our website supply information about the cutting art, wood or paper cutting, free patterns or tutorials for DIY wood/paper cutting. Besides, you can find some articals for design with graphic software (as Coreldraw, photoshop, sketchup, blender….)

DOWNLOAD PATTERN CLICK HERE
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AOC Craft
Website: http://aocraft.com
Facebook: https://fb.com/artofcutting
Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/thecuttingart/

KIRIGAMI – Easy or Not ????? Level of players

What is kirigami?

Firstly, at the very beginning, let us show you some basic concepts of kirigami.

The term of “Kirigami” originally used in paper-cutting art of Japan (of which the main producing process is folding paper into sections, then trimming to create symmetrical cut paper pattern over 1 center). On 10/12/2010, the fanpage and club of 3D pop up card and paper cutting in VN was established on FB, using the term in refer to all type of paper cutting (perhaps because it is compact, rhyme and easy to read: D). Therefore, term of kirigami is commonly used at present, does not refer to paper cut art comes from Japan only. Because in fact, very few players in Vietnam followed trdiational Japanese style of kirigami (even Kirie – Japanese paper cutting painting, seems not very popular.)

 

In general, paper cutting art is basically divided into:

          -Bearly paper cutting: or ZERO degree kirigami. There are several sub categories in this type as silhouette, stencil, china paper cutting… This type is considered cornerstone for the latter development into other types.

          -Pop-up cards: 3D cards that can be folded into flat surface. There are several methods to creat 3D cards that can be opend in range from 0 to 360 degree. The content in such cards is ussuallly very abundant, basically devided into smaller groups:

               + Outline cutting: It is popular with cards designed by using triangle method combining slice form or multi layer. Glue is usually used to connect parts of card.

               + Pop up kiri (all motifs are created by cutting, color printing is limited or nod used). It’s common with slice form and multi layer, triangle style is relatively rare. Glue is not used. Latches or interlock links are usually used in such types.

               +OA (origami architechture) is presenting architecture on paper, often used sliceform (180 degree) or multilayer (90 degree). It is considered a typical group in pop up kiri.

So how to conclude? Is kirigami easy or not?

It’s hard to find out a general anwer for this question. There are many players said it’s easy, but no less than than say it’s too difficult, it depends on your own. Thus, this post is mainly to discuss the level of kirigami players, hope that it can be a reference to help you evaluafe your skill yourself. This ranking is for all categories that I presented before, because writer couldn’t have sound knowledge in all of them.

Level 1: Players that can cut based on available patterns.

In kirigami, the card are usually cut out and finished by the author, then there will be 1 cutting template (pattern) provided to people based on that; they then cut the lines on the paper to complete (0 degrees), or then fold to complete based on a sample of finished products (pop-up). It’s pretty easy for you to reach this level, because anyone can cut the lines on paper. Workmanship is classified based on the cutting speed and sharpness of line cutting, ability to folding 90 degree cards, OA, or attach precisely 180 degree pieces sliceform. Proficiency in this level, you have a clear understanding kirigami then. And it also decided your passion to kirigami, you’ll probably give up because it’s too boring, easily, because all you need is simply downloading pattern, printing on paper, then cutting and finishing, (nothing can be easier, right?). But there are also players who learn deeper in this subject, and move on to Level 2.

 

Level 2 refers to people who can redraw other’s work.

First of all, write would confirm that, redrawing a pattern is not a challenge, it does not require a professional drawing skill, or skillfulness. The only requirement is that the understanding of basic principle of kirigami, to explore the method used by the author, then finish the pattern is too simple. And to understand the principles, avoiding errors in the rendering process, they should have experience in cuttingand proficiency in cutting ability. Once player have mastered this level, usually forwarded to the next level, few people stop at this level without progress further.

 

Level 3 includes those modifying pattern of others into their style.

Based on available ideas and methods from their predecessors, players can change according to their own ideas. It requires greater creativity than just redrawing of others. With this level, players partly reflect their own self through work, and can also help distinguish themselves between many other kirigami fans.

 

Level 4: Realize your own ideas.

After redrawing the pattern of other authors, having ability to modify according to their own pattern, then gradually, players can also express their own ideas based on past experience. At this level, the individual mark is expressed most clearly, because it contains the whole idea as your understanding of kirigami, the auxiliary talents like drawing, matching, logic … to achieve this level, then you have one fairly broad understanding of kirigami, for each category, the simple, the complexity of each method, and choose the method and style appropriate for the charcoal. Once mastered it, you can flatten almost the whole world in your way, can produce your own style, his own image in the community kirigami. Among those who express their own ideas through works in kirigami, there is obviously some people that still keep the style  of the author before who they go under, and sometimes difficult to escape from that style, like a trail. But surely, there will be no doubt about love and passion for kirigami of those players 🙂

 

Level 5: Realize the idea of ​​other people

You may be wondering, why level 4 is not the highest level, which is the highest level. In my point of view, then at level 4, every work is customized to author’s style, thus no matter it’s beautiful or not, it’s still achievement of author. But at this level, on the other, to express the idea of ​​other people, other people’s mark is what left on the paper, combining author’s style and other’s idea into the design is not an easy task, especially when the idea was to not have a deep understanding of this subject. More importantly, when the work is created, others will be given, give damn it, the designer will have to accept this, like it or not. So surely it is harder in comparison with developing author’s own idea.

WAY TO SUCCESS – Pop up card pattern

 

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“Only those who dare to fail greatly can ever achieve greatly.”

Do you take any risks in your life? Do you set your goals high, and then work hard to reach them? If not, how much progress can you be making? Of course, there is always a slight chance that you might fail, but you will have learned invaluable lessons along the way. So don’t be scared to have high expectations for yourself. If you have reached one goal, set another one, one that might be even more of a challenge. For example, maybe you want to run a marathon, but are too scared to make this your goal. You are allowed to start small. Start by just running a local 5k, and then a 10k. Smaller victories along your path will lead to greater ones.

We attach here a new pattern from author Tien Phuong. Hope that you will always keep your passion and strong desire to achieve success in the future.

The patterned is designed and drafted by Sketchup software

DOWNLOAD HERE

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For more tutorials, videos or patterns, please follow and check out website at http://aoccraft.com/
Our website supply information about the cutting art, wood or paper cutting, free patterns or tutorials for DIY wood/paper cutting. Besides, you can find some articals for design with graphic software (as Coreldraw, photoshop, sketchup, blender….)
—————————————-­—–
AOC Craft
Website: http://aocraft.com
Facebook: https://fb.com/artofcutting
Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/thecuttingart/

 

Washi paper-Great material for pop up cards and craft.

Washi-paper-Great-material-for-pop-up-cards-and-craft-1

If you are looking for a material that looks traditional but still luxury with a variety of vivid color to add into your pop up cards, why don’t you take a look at Washi paper, a Japanese traditional paper that feels like cotton. Many origami player knows this type, but in fact, it can be used in other ways.

Washi is generally tougher than ordinary paper made from wood pulp, and is used in many traditional arts. Origami, Shodo, and Ukiyo-ewere all produced using washi. Washi was also used to make various everyday goods like clothes, household goods, and toys as well as vestments and ritual objects for Shinto priests and statues of Buddha. It was even used to make wreaths that were given to winners in the1998 Winter Paralympics. Several kinds of washi, referred to collectively as Japanese tissue, are used in the conservation and mending of books.

1, Origin

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Washi (和紙) is a style of paper that was first made in Japan. Washi is commonly made using fibers from the bark of the gampi tree, themitsumata shrub (Edgeworthia chrysantha), or the paper mulberry, but also can be made using bamboo, hemp, rice, and wheat. The word “washi” comes from wa ‘Japanese’ and shi ‘paper’, and the term is used to describe paper made by hand in the traditional manner. Washi is one of the UNESCO’s Intangible cultural heritage objects.

2, Production process

Washi is produced in a way similar to that of ordinary paper, but fewer chemicals are used. It involves a long and intricate process that is often undertaken in the cold weather of winter, as pure, cold running water is essential to the production of washi. Cold inhibits bacteria, preventing the decomposition of the fibers. Cold also makes the fibers contract, producing a crisp feel to the paper. It is traditionally the winter work of farmers, a task that supplemented a farmer’s income.

Kozo is the most commonly used fiber in making Japanese paper. The kozo branches are boiled and stripped of their outer bark, and then dried. The fibers are then boiled withlye to remove the starch, fat and tannin, and then placed in running water to remove the lye. The fibers are then bleached (either with chemicals or naturally, by placing it in a protected area of a stream) and any remaining impurities in the fibers are picked out by hand. The kozo is laid on a rock or board and beaten.

Wet balls of pulp are mixed in a vat with water (and, in some cases, neri, which is a mucilaginous material made from the roots of the tororo plant) and one of two traditional methods of paper making (nagashi-zuki or tame-zuki) is employed. In both methods, pulp is scooped onto a screen and shaken to spread the fibers evenly. Nagashi-zuki (which uses neri in the vat) produces a thinner paper, while tame-zuki (which does not use neri) produces a thicker paper.

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3, Characteristic

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Warmth. Literally warmer to the touch than Western papers made of woodpulp, washi feels soft and creates a feeling of warmth in the viewer. Its tactile qualities make it wonderful for invitations and books.

Body. Since the fibres are left long and pounded and stretched rather than chopped, washi has a deceptive strength. Pure-fibred washi can even be sewn and was used for armour and kimono-lining in earlier times.

Strength. The length of the fibres and the nature of the raw materials ensure that washi is highly workable when wet. Thus it is excellent for papier maché, and etching in which the paper must be soaked. These long fibres produce a luxurious deckle edge, the rough edge which marks a handmade paper.

Soft translucency. Kozo and mitsumata are naturally translucent fibres, a quality specific to paper from the East. As such, it is used regularly for the transmission of light.

Absorbency. The nature of the fibres creates a ready absorption of inks and dyes. Papers that are “pure fibred” and dyed will result in much denser and more vibrant colour when fabric or watercolour dyes are applied.

Flexibility. Since the fibres position themselves at random, there is no real grain to washi. This gives the paper a resistance to creasing, wrinkling and tearing – and means it can be used more like cloth, for covering books, or boxes etc.

Lightness. Washi weighs much less than other papers of equal thickness. As a paper for books, it can create texts of apparent weightlessness.

Low acidity. Traditionally-made Japanese papers are truly acid-free if they are unbleached and unsized. Examples of printed papers exist in perfect condition in Japan from 1000 years ago. Today, papers from the village of Kurotani are among the finest archival papers.

Decoration. For centuries, colourful designs applied by woodblock or handcut stencils have created vividly characteristic papers, for decorative use. Recently, silkscreened chiyogami (small repeated-patterned paper) is available in an unbelievable range and widely used by craftspeople. Although made by machine, the quality available is about 70% kozo and comes in hundreds of patterns.

These features bring washi advantage in decoration, especially in superfluity product where colorfulness is necessary.

 

4, Application/Usage

Until the early 20th century, the Japanese used washi in applications where wood pulp paper or other materials are currently used. This is partly because washi was cheaper, but also because the unique characteristics of washi made it a better material. The different uses of washi are too numerous to mention, but include the following:

  • Ikebana — the art of flower arrangement, also known as kadō

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  • Katazome — a method of dyeing fabrics using a resist paste

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  • Kitemaking
  • Origami — the art of paper folding

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  • Printmaking

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  • Sculpture
  • Sewing
  • Shibori — several methods of dyeing cloth with a pattern
  • Shodo — the art of calligraphy
  • Sumi-e — the art of Ink wash painting
  • Sumingashi — a form of paper marbling
  • Ukiyo-e — a genre of woodblock prints
  • Washi eggs — covering eggs with washi paper
  • Chigirie  – using Washi for “painting” pictures
  • More than that, pop-up cards which is usually monotone, can make use of this traditional paper to bring an abundance of color and material, make pop up cards more vivid and close to real life

Which paper should be used in pop-up cards making?

I, Some concepts about paper in general

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Paper is a thin material produced by pressing together moist fibers, typically cellulose pulp derived from wood, rags or grasses, and drying them into flexible sheets. It is a very versatile material with many uses; whilst the most common one is for writing and printing upon, it is also widely used as a packaging material; in many cleaning products; in a number of industrial and construction processes, and even as a food ingredient – particularly in Asian cultures.

It and the pulp papermaking process is said to have been developed in China during the early 2nd century AD, possibly as early as the year 105 A.D., by the Han court eunuch Cai Lun, although the earliest archaeological fragments of paper derive from the 2nd century BC in China. The modern pulp and paper industry is global, with China leading its production and the United States right behind it.

Besides category by purpose; basically, paper is classified by name and weight:

Name: there are several kinds of common paper and specific paper which will be shown latter in this thread.

Weight: Is the weight of paper calculated by gram per square meter (g/m2). In Europe, and other regions using the ISO 216 paper sizing system, the weight is expressed in grams per square meter (g/m2 or usually just g) of the paper. In the United States, the weight assigned to a paper is the weight of a ream, 500 sheets, of varying “basic sizes”, before the paper is cut into the size it is sold to end customers.

Paper weight is usually variant from 80-300 gram depends on types of paper. Printing paper is generally between 60 g and 120 g. Anything heavier than 160 g is considered cards. The weight of a ream therefore depends on the dimensions of the paper and its thickness.

Normal paper used in photocopying or printing is usually 70-80 gsm.

The thickness of paper is often measured by caliper, which is typically given in thousandths of an inch in the United States and in thousandths of a mm in the rest of the world. Paper may be between 0.07 millimeters (0.0028 in) and 0.18 millimeters (0.0071 in) thick.

All size in the Series A, B and C are rectangle shape with the ratio of 2 sides is the square root of 2, approximately 1.414. The area of A0 paper is 1m².

– The 2 sides of A0 are therefore determined as 841 × 1189mm

– The size of the blocks are in the order determined backward, smaller size has an area equal to 50% of previous size (divided by cutting along the line parallel to the short side).

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II, Some common types/brand of paper (typically for pop-up cards making):

Various in weight and texture, paper is divided into several types, suitable for different kinds of pop-up cards:

1, Plain and thin paper (60-90gsm): Ford paper

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This type is very popular and mainly used to print the template/ pattern, or only to draw. However, pop-up cards with many details can use this one to make the process easier.

2, Plain but thicker (120-180gsm or heavier):

A, This type can be found easily in any stationery shop anywhere. Typically Kishu paper is most common with a huge range of vivid color and weight. Kishu paper can be bought in Korea or Japan. Due to the variety, this one is useful in almost types of pop up cards

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B, Canson also has plain paper products. This type is thicker and can keep the form very well. Thus this is usually used in cards making, no matter the price is a bit expensive. The surface of Canson is also suitable for drawing, sketching, therefore many artists choose this brand. Canson paper sometimes has veins which makes pop-up products look more luxury.

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3, Texture paper

A, Conqueror Paper, of which origin in London, England, is another popular brand. Characterized by veins along the paper, this type is good at form-keeping. Being thicker and having deeper color, it’s best fit the cover of a cards. Whilst, some light colors of this brand like cream color is a good choice when cardss made by white paper is becoming uninteresting. However, sometimes vein is the problem due to the fact that they makes your cut not precise.

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B, Thai Basil paper is also a special paper with vein along but thicker and heavier. The color is limited and mostly deep but when you need a thick paper to keep the form in 90 degree cards, it is still a good choice.  

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How to drawDraw pattern Tianjin Eye Bridge (OA 180)quilling pattern

Draw pattern Tianjin Eye Bridge (OA 180)

Draw pattern Tianjin Eye Bridge (OA 180)

Tianjin Eye is a 120-metre (394 ft) tall giant Ferris wheel built above the Yongle Bridge (formerly Chihai Bridge), over the Hai Riverin Tianjin, China. It is claimed to be the only such wheel to have been constructed over a bridge.

Construction started in 2007, with completion of the main body on 18 December 2007, and the wheel opened to the public on 7 April 2008.

At the time of its completion, only the 135 m (443 ft) London Eye, 160 m (525 ft) Star of Nanchang, and 165 m (541 ft) Singapore Flyer were taller.

Tianjin Eye is one of four 120 m Ferris wheels in China, the other three being Changsha Ferris Wheel (completed 2004), Suzhou Ferris Wheel (completed 2009), and Zhengzhou Ferris Wheel (completed 2003). The only Chinese Ferris wheel with a greater height is the 160 m (525 ft) Star of Nanchang, which opened in 2006.

Tianjin Eye is electrically powered and has 48 passenger capsules, each able to carry 8 passengers, and takes 30 minutes to complete a rotation, giving a maximum capacity of 768 passengers per hour.

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For more tutorials, videos or patterns, please follow and check out website at http://aoccraft.com/
Our website supply information about the cutting art, wood or paper cutting, free patterns or tutorials for DIY wood/paper cutting. Besides, you can find some articals for design with graphic software (as Coreldraw, photoshop, sketchup, blender….)

DOWNLOAD PATTERN CLICK HERE
—————————————-­—–
AOC Craft
Website: http://aocraft.com
Facebook: https://fb.com/artofcutting
Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/thecuttingart/

Pop up card from idea to design

Pop up card from idea to design

Pop up card from idea to design

For more tutorials, videos or patterns, please follow and check out website at http://aoccraft.com/
Our website supply information about the cutting art, wood or paper cutting, free patterns or tutorials for DIY wood/paper cutting. Besides, you can find some articals for design with graphic software (as Coreldraw, photoshop, sketchup, blender….)

DOWNLOAD PATTERN CLICK HERE
—————————————-­—–
AOC Craft
Website: http://aocraft.com
Facebook: https://fb.com/artofcutting
Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/thecuttingart/

Draw pattern dragonfly pop up card – AOC Craft

Draw pattern dragonfly pop up card – AOC Craft

For more tutorials, videos or patterns, please follow and check out website at http://aoccraft.com/
Our website supply information about the cutting art, wood or paper cutting, free patterns or tutorials for DIY wood/paper cutting. Besides, you can find some articals for design with graphic software (as Coreldraw, photoshop, sketchup, blender….)

DOWNLOAD PATTERN CLICK HERE
—————————————-­—–
AOC Craft
Website: http://aocraft.com
Facebook: https://fb.com/artofcutting
Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/thecuttingart/